Trump vs. California: In Blow to Climate, U.S. Revokes State’s Stricter Auto Emissions Standards

California is in a legal battle with the Trump administration over tailpipe emissions, air quality and climate change. California recently joined nearly two dozen other states to file a lawsuit against the Trump administration after it revoked the state’s air pollution standards for cars and light trucks, in its latest regulatory rollback of laws aimed at slowing the climate crisis.

Auto emissions are California’s single largest source of greenhouse gases. From Los Angeles, we’re joined by Mary Nichols, the longtime chair of the California Air Resources Board. She has led the board in crafting California’s internationally recognized climate action plan. Michael Brune, executive director of the Sierra Club, speaks with us from San Francisco.

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